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2017 Workshops

Wednesday, March 15, 2017


#1 - Introducing the MMPI-A-RF

Robert P. Archer, PhD, Bay Forensic Psychology, Norfolk, VA

Wednesday, March 15, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

The purpose of this workshop is to provide an introduction to the MMPI-A-RF, the most recently developed form of the MMPI. The MMPI-A-RF is a 241-item self-report measure of adolescent personality and psychopathology. The test has 48 scales of which six are Validity scales, and the remaining 42 Substantial scales form a three-tiered hierarchical structure consisting of Higher-Order scales, Restructured Clinical (RC) scales, and Specific Problem (SP) scales. The MMPI-A-RF is the result of a multi-your project sponsored by the University of Minnesota Press. The current workshop will review the rationale for the development of the MMPI-A-RF, including the theoretical basis of the project. The workshop will also provide an overview of the psychometric characteristics of the Validity and Substantial scales. An interpretation model we be presented,, and illustrated through the review of a clinical case example

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe the rationale for, and methods used in, the development of the MMPI-A-RF
  • Determine when to administer the MMPI-A-RF
  • Optimally utilize the MMPI-A-RF Validity and Substantive scales
  • Developed a comprehensive interpretation strategy for the MMPI-A-RF

Skill Level:

This workshop is an introduction to the MMPI-A-RF. Graduate level education and assessment training is required, and prior training in the MMPI-2-RF is helpful.

#2 - An Ultra-brief Model of Therapeutic Assessment (TA) with Adult Clients

Stephen E. Finn, PhD, Center for Therapeutic Assessment, Austin, TX

Jan H. Kamphuis, PhD, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Hilde De Saeger, Viersorong Institute for the Study of Personality Disorder, The Netherlands

Wednesday, March 15, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Finn, Kamphuis, and de Saeger will teach an ultra-brief (i.e., 2-3 hour) empirically supported model of Therapeutic Assessment with adult clients and illustrate it with video clips and role plays. This training is intended for clinicians who are interested in TA but feel unable to implement it due to time limitations in their settings. This ultra-brief version of TA requires expertise in one valid adult self-report inventory (e.g., MMPI-2, MMPI-2-RF, PAI, or MCMI-III) and is most applicable to distressed, help-seeking clients in either outpatient or inpatient treatment settings. Participants will learn how to conduct focused initial interviews, do optional, effective brief assessment intervention sessions, and give impactful feedback. The presenters will also present empirical evidence for the model and discuss when it is likely to be most effective.

Goals and Objectives:

At the end of the training, participants will be able to:

  • Describe an ultra-brief model of TA with adult clients and discuss when it is likely to be useful
  • Explain the benefits of TA with adults that have been documented empirically
  • Explain the goals of the initial session of TA
  • Explain how to use a valid self-report test to address clients’ questions for an assessment
  • Describe a standardized assessment intervention technique with the TAT
  • List important factors to keep in mind when giving assessment feedback

Skill Level:

This is an introductory workshop geared for participants of all levels.

#3 - Introduction to the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS)

Joni Mihura, PhD, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH

Wednesday, March 15, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This workshop provides a basic introduction to the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS; Meyer, Viglione, Mihura, Erard, & Erdberg, 2011). The goal is to provide workshop attendees with the basic information about R-PAS administration, coding, and interpretation, which includes normative comparisons, introduction to the computer scoring program, and interpretive procedures. In the 2nd part of the workshop, we will practice applying what you’ve learned to a case. It will be assumed that attendees have at least some previous experience with the Rorschach. The workshop can also be attended by students who have not had any Rorschach training, as long as attendees are aware that transitioning from the Rorschach Comprehensive System (CS) to R-PAS will be a significant component of the workshop. But for everyone attending the workshop, for better ease of understanding the material, it is recommended that you at least familiarize yourself with the new R-PAS variable names, which you can review in Appendix B of the R-PAS test manual (Meyer et al., 2011), and the layout of the Page 1 and 2 R-PAS results. There will be time for questions and discussion throughout the workshop. Basic information about R-PAS is available at www.r-pas.org.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe the rationale for the development of a new Rorschach system.
  • Familiarize the participants with the empirical support for different aspects of the Rorschach.
  • Understand the research support for each R-PAS variable and the practice implications.
  • Understand the basics of R-PAS administration, scoring, and interpretation.
  • Apply the material to an R-PAS case interpretation.

Skill Level:

Novice level with regard to R-PAS.

#4 - Integrating Multimethod Assessment results in a Meaningful Way for the Client

Pamela Schaber, PhD, Center for Therapeutic Assessment, Austin, TX

Filippo Aschieri, PhD, European Center for Therapeutic Assessment, Milano, Italy

Wednesday, March 15, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Presenters will describe a model for thinking through complicated multi-method assessment cases integrating data from self- report, performance based assessment, cognitive testing, etc. Presenters will discuss several theoretical approaches commonly used in Therapeutic Assessment to provide assessors and clients with comprehensive case conceptualizations that empathically and accurately describe the problems in living for the client. Participants will practice applying the model using a case example. Participants attending the course should have knowledge of at least one self-report, cognitive measure, and performance based assessment test.

Goals and Objectives:

  • List multiple theories helpful in thinking about testing and clients.
  • Apply at least one theory to a case conceptualization.
  • Identify key points in addressing clients’ and referring professional questions for the assessment using the conceptualization.
  • Integrate data for one example case.

Skill Level:

This is an introductory workshop for psychologists and graduate students at all levels of training.

#5 - How to Review Papers

David L. Streiner, PhD, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada

Daniel A. Sass, PhD. University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

Wednesday, March 15, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This is a free workshop for members of the JPA editorial board only. It will briefly cover the different roles of the reviewer, the tenor of the review, and what to look for in each part of the paper -- the introduction, methods, results, and discussion. Most of the session will be a refresher of statistical methods such as regression, ANOVA, multivariate methods, as well as the differences between classical test theory and item response theory.

Goals and Objectives:

  • To discuss what reviewers should look for in papers sent for review.
  • To update the attendees' knowledge of statistical methods used in papers submitted to JPA.
  • To acquaint attendees with modern methods of scale development, such as item response theory.

Skill Level:

Must be members of the JPA editorial board.

#6 - Personality Assessment Consultation Opportunities with the Federal Aviation Administration: An Orientation to FAA Practices and Standards

Chris Front, PsyD, ABAP, Federal Aviation Administration

Wednesday, March 15, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Personality assessment is an essential element in pre-employment and fitness for duty evaluations for a variety of public safety- sensitive positions. Many psychologists specializing in personality assessment have developed consultation relationships with police and other public safety agencies. Fewer have become consultants for the FAA, which relies on psychologists skilled in personality assessment to conduct thorough evaluations of pilots and air traffic controllers. The FAA is actively recruiting psychologists who are skilled in personality assessment to join its team of consultants. This workshop is designed to prepare such psychologists to perform both pre-employment and fitness for duty evaluations for the FAA. The workshop will begin with a brief review of the legal and ethical issues involved in conducting pre-employment and fitness for duty evaluations. An orientation to the unique psychological demands inherent in the aviation environment and the standards necessary for aviation safety will follow. The main focus of the workshop will be on the special considerations required for pre-employment and fitness for duty evaluations conducted with pilots and air traffic controllers for the FAA, including published and unpublished normative test score patterns for those populations, the safety relevance of subclinical conditions, and the differences between DSM-5 diagnoses and FAA regulatory standards. A discussion of test data, psychosocial history, clinical interview, MSE, and collateral information to guide and support decisions will follow. Case examples will be provided to illustrate assessment practices and FAA standards.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe the unique psychological demands of working in the aviation environment.
  • Describe the most salient ethical and legal issues in conducting pre-employment and fitness for duty evaluations for public safety-sensitive positions.
  • Utilize normative score patterns (e.g., MMPI-2 means and S.D.s for pilots and Air Traffic Control Specialist Applicants) when conducting test interpretation.
  • Discuss the differences between DSM-5 diagnoses and FAA regulatory standards.
  • Explain the safety relevance of subclinical conditions in the aviation work environment.

Skill Level:

Participants with intermediate to advanced skills in personality assessment will benefit most from this workshop.

#7 - Integrating the R-PAS and the PAI

Chris Hopwood, PhD, Michigan State University

Joni Mihura, PhD, University of Toledo

Greg Meyer, PhD University of Toledo

Wednesday, March 15, 1:15 pm – 5:00 (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This 1-day workshop is designed to provide case illustrations of integrated multimethod assessment contextualizing what people see, say, and do when completing the performance-based Rorschach task in the context of how they understand and describe themselves on introspectively assessed self-report with the Personality Assessment Inventory. It is ideal for clinicians working in applied practice, instructors teaching multimethod psychological assessment, and doctoral students refining their skills in multimethod assessment. The workshop alternates between didactic lecture and instructor-led case discussion. Attendees are invited to bring de-identified case material with PAI and R-PAS data to discuss if there is time.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe basic principles of multimethod assessment
  • Describe broad methods - the PAI as self-report and R-PAS as a performance task
  • Describe micro-methods within the PAI and micro-methods within R-PAS
  • Describe implications of cross-method agreement
  • Describe implications of cross-method disagreement
  • Demonstrate multimethod interpretation skills via case review

Skill Level:

We provide an overview of both R-PAS and the PAI, though participants should be familiar with both methods and ideally have good familiarity with at least one of these methods before the workshop because we do not provide training in the fundamentals of either.

#8 - Proficiency in Personality Assessment: Producing an Integrated Report

Hadas Pade, PsyD, Alliant International University

A. Jordan Wright, PhD, Empire State College, SUNY

Wednesday, March 15, 1:15 pm – 5:00 pm (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This intermediate workshop presents the common challenges in writing integrated psychological assessment reports as well as strategies to improve integrated writing. Participants will also learn and practice several specific steps to better organize and integrate their assessment findings. In addition to directly developing or strengthening participants’ own report writing skills, report writing tips applicable to students and trainees will be discussed.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe the importance of producing well-integrated reports
  • Identify common challenges in producing well-integrated reports
  • Utilize specific strategies to better organize data towards producing an integrated report.

Skill Level:

Anyone who is learning, practicing, or teaching/supervising personality assessment. Participants need to be familiar with at least some personality measures and psychological assessment process in general.

#9 - Children in the Legal System: Using Research to More Accurately Assess and to Hear Their Voices

Ginger C. Calloway, PhD, Private Practice, Raleigh, NC

Margaret Lee, PhD, Private Practice, Mill Valley, CA

Wednesday, March 15, 1:15 pm – 9:45 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Children are involved in the legal system in different venues and roles. Children may be witnesses in the courtroom, informants in sexual abuse evaluations, reporters in family law cases or their opinions may be assessed for reliability in international Hague cases. In order to obtain reliable, useful information from children, one needs to know how to apply developmental information when interviewing children, and know the research regarding challenges to relying on children’s testimony, given issues such as memory, suggestibility and limitations due to immature language development. Questioning and assessing children without tainting information requires knowledge of that research. A newer emphasis in family law and from the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Children calls on having children’s voices heard in matters that involve decisions about their lives. The legal standards in different domains must also be considered, when assessing the reliability and usefulness of children’s testimony and may limit expert opinions that can be rendered utilizing that data. This workshop will review relevant research on children’s language and cognitive development, including memory and suggestibility; will explore pitfalls when interviewing and assessing children in the legal context and will provide the legal context for the most common roles and venues where children participate in the legal system. The second part of this workshop will involve case presentations that apply the research to an array of cases.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Participants will understand the various venues in which children serve as informants and/or witnesses and the demands inherent to each situation..
  • Participants will identify developmental influences including memory, suggestibility and use of language for interviewing children.
  • Participants will identify potential sources of bias in interviewing children.
  • Participants will identify relevant research findings as they relate to children's testimony and participation in the legal process.
  • Participants will list differences in children's ability to participate as witnesses and informants and state the source of these differences.
  • Participants will identify the different legal standards that apply in cases involving children's testimony or statements.

Skill Level:

Participants need to have some exposure in interviewing and assessing children.

#10 - Proficiency in Personality Assessment: Producing a Client-Centered Report

Steve Smith, PhD, University of California

Jamie Kent, PhD, Palo Alto University

Wednesday, March 15, 6:00 pm – 9:45 pm (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This intermediate workshop presents the common challenges in producing client-centered written assessment reports as well as strategies to improve integrated writing. Participants will also learn and practice several specific steps to transform test- centered into client-centered writing. In addition to directly developing or strengthening participants’ own report writing skills, report writing tips applicable to students and trainees will be discussed. Participants are encouraged to bring laptops with one or two de-identified reports that they have written.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe the importance of producing client-centered reports
  • Identify common challenges in producing client-centered reports
  • Utilize specific strategies to strengthen client-centered writing when discussing testing data and recommendations.

Skill Level:

Anyone who is learning, practicing, or teaching/supervising personality assessment. Participants need to be familiar with at least some personality measures and psychological assessment process in general.

#11 - A Comparison of EFA, CFA, ESEM, and Bayesian CFA: Selecting the Best Modeling Approach

Daniel A. Sass, PhD, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

Wednesday, March 15, 6:00 pm – 9:45 pm (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This workshop focuses on a comparison of exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), exploratory structural equation model (ESEM), and Bayesian factor analysis, with a primary focus on when and why to use each factor analytic model. Participants will be taught how to run these models using Mplus, interpret the output, and statistically compare models. Also included will be a presentation of relevant procedures commonly connected to factor analysis (e.g., parallel analysis) and key statistical concepts (e.g., model fit). Lastly, this workshop will outline what information should be included in published research, along with the best approaches to present this information.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Explain when to use EFA, CFA, ESEM, and BCFA
  • Compare and interpret EFA, CFA, ESEM, and BCFA results
  • Outline what to include in published research
  • Demonstrate how to use Mplus for these models

Skill Level:

This course will be taught at an introductory level and open to anyone interested in these topics

#12 - The Rorschach Comprehensive system: Coding and Administration

Barry Ritzler, PhD, Rorschach Training Program, Long Island University

David Shmerler, PhD

Wednesday, March 15, 6:00 pm – 9:45 pm (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

The workshop will cover coding issues that frequently puzzle the Rorschach psychologist. Since proper administration of the method usually reduces the difficulty of coding decisions, Ms. Monday will begin by reviewing proper administration procedures. Next, Dr. Ritzler will cover difficult coding issues such as FC versus CF, active versus passive movement, shading determinants, and special scores. He will provide simple guidelines for enhancing reliability and accuracy of coding. There will be a discussion of the variables of XA%, WDA%, HRV, and PTI. The correct procedures for calculating these variables, their interpretive significance, and supporting empirical evidence will be reviewed.

Goals and Objectives:

  • To improve administration skills, particularly inquiry, to provide more effective, necessary information for correct coding.
  • To provide guidelines for making difficult scoring decisions.
  • To familiarize participants with Comprehensive System variables such as XA%, WDA%, HRV, and PTI.
  • To answer questions participants may have about coding issues.

Skill Level:

Participants need to have some familiarity with the Rorschach Comprehensive System.

#13 - Assessing Defense Mechanisms with the TAT

Phebe Cramer, PhD, Williams College, Williamstown, MA

Wednesday, March 15, 6:00 pm – 9:45 pm (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

The workshop will present a reliable and valid method to assess the use of defense mechanisms through the analysis of TAT stories or other narrative material. This approach is based on a theory of defense mechanism development from birth to adulthood. The theory will be discussed and illustrated. Participants will learn the defense coding system through illustrations and through experience in applying it to protocols provided. These materials will be used to illustrate developmental differences and expectations, as well as differences in clinical patients of different diagnostic categories. Changes in defense use that accompany psychotherapeutic intervention will also be illustrated.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Discuss defense mechanisms from a developmental point of view.
  • Explain a coding system for assessing defense mechanisms from TAT stories.
  • Apply this method to TAT stories provided.
  • Discover how the method has been used with clinical and non-clinical groups.

Skill Level:

Advanced graduate students in Personality/Clinical Psychology; PhD participants

#14 - Therapeutic Feedback with the MMPI-2 - A Demonstration

Richard Levak, PhD, Independent Practice, Del Mar, CA

Philip Keddy, PhD, Wright Institute, Berkeley and Independent Practice, Oakland, CA

Wednesday, March 15, 6:00 pm – 9:45 pm (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Dr. Levak will demonstrate giving feedback about MMPI-2 results directly to "client-actors". Dr. Keddy will briefly discuss the background of Levak's approach and how it is an example of collaborative/therapeutic assessment. Dr. Keddy will introduce Dr. Levak and Dr. Keddy's students from the Wright Institute in Berkeley who will be the client-actors. Dr. Levak's method forms the basis for the book "Therapeutic Feedback with the MMPI-2: A Positive Psychology Approach" (Routledge, 2011) that he authored, along with Liza Siegel, David S. Nichols, and Ronald A. Stolberg. Dr. Levak will only know the "client's" MMPI-2 results and basic identifying information. Three different grad students will role play their respective clients. The grad students will have gotten to know their clients by assessing them and possibly having done therapy with them as well. These demonstrations will be "live" in that they will not be scripted. The MMPI-2 results will be projected for the audience and client-actors to see. Discussion with the audience will be encouraged during and after the demonstrations.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Demonstrate how MMPI-2 test results can help to understand the client.
  • Demonstrate how the results can be communicated directly to clients in an empathic way.
  • Demonstrate how the giving of feedback becomes a collaborative/therapeutic intervention.

Skill Level:

Some familiarity with interpreting MMPI-2 profiles will be helpful.



Thursday, March 16, 2017


#15 - The Basic Principles and Advanced Statistics Used to Build a Personality Measure

Michael J. Roche, PhD, Penn State Altoona, Altoona, PA

Thursday, March 16, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This workshop provides an overview of how personality measures are constructed and validated. This half-day workshop will be divided into three sections: basics of test construction and validation, factor analysis, and longitudinal data analysis. The first section will be a general introduction to measure construction, including concepts relevant for the preliminary stage (e.g. identifying universe on content, item pool writing, pre-screening items for bias, readability, etc.), developmental stage (e.g. reliability, psychometric evaluation of scales, factor structure, etc.), and validation stage (e.g. confirming psychometric properties, convergent and discriminant validity, etc.). These principles will be illustrated using personality measures that are common in the literature (e.g. PAI, PID, TAT, etc.). The second section introduces factor analysis, its theoretical foundations, statistical foundations, strengths/limitations, and how various forms of factor analysis are used to examine the factor structure of several common personality measures. The third section discusses the use of longitudinal data in personality measures. Similar to section two, we review the theoretical foundations, statistical foundations, strengths/limitations, and how longitudinal data is commonly employed for evaluating personality measures (e.g. test-retest reliability, predictive validity) and new ways longitudinal data is employed (e.g. daily collection of longitudinal data, within- person associations, and psychometric properties when the personality measures themselves are at a daily or weekly timescale). By the end of this workshop, attendants will be more knowledgeable in how personality measures are constructed, and the steps necessary to construct a measure of their own.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe the steps in personality measure development and validation.
  • Explain the concept of factor analysis along with its appropriate uses and limitations.
  • Compare strengths/limitations of using single-occasion versus longitudinal data for the purpose of reliability and validity.

Skill Level:

The skill level is beginner.

#16 - Conquering Assessment Intervention Sessions (AIS) in Therapeutic Assessment: A Model to Choose and Plan Different Types of AI with Individuals and Systems

Marita Frackowiak, PhD, Center for Therapeutic Assessment, Austin, TX

Lionel Chudzik, PhD, University of Tours, France

Francesca Fantini, PhD, European Center for Therapeutic Assessment, Milano, Italy

Thursday, March 16, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

In Therapeutic Assessment (TA), Assessment Intervention Sessions (AIS) are utilized to in-vivo test hypotheses from assessor’s clinical case conceptualization. These sessions are an opportunity to help the client(s) observe and find new solutions to their main struggles/dilemmas. Assessment Intervention Sessions (AIS) are well known to be the most difficult step in the TA process for many assessors (Finn, 2007). This difficulty comes from the fact that the assessor has numerous questions to address while planning the intervention: What kind of a dilemma or problem behavior can we bring into the room? How should I do that? Will the client get too overwhelmed? Can the client handle it? Can I handle it? This workshop will address these types of typical questions. The presenters will teach a model which can be used to plan AIS based on the level of emotional engagement expected from the client. The presenters will introduce three types of AIS: Low Engagement Intervention, Medium Engagement Intervention, High Engagement Intervention. Factors such as the level of psychopathology of the client, the level of insight and the quality of the client/assessor relationship will be discussed for each level. Examples of procedures to use and specific Assessment Interventions ideas will be discussed and demonstrated via video clips. The participants will have an opportunity to practice in small role play groups. Assessment Intervention ideas will be presented for both individual clients and family systems.

Goals and Objectives:

  • To describe at least three clinical factors important to consider when planning an AIS.
  • To discuss the differences in the levels of emotional engagement in AIS
  • To list different kinds of possible AI techniques/ideas.
  • To plan step by step at least three different AI.
  • To role play an AI in small groups.

Skill Level:

This is an introductory workshop for psychologists and graduate students, with basic knowledge of psychological measures and Therapeutic Assessment.

#17 - Rorschach Assessment of Personality Disorder

Philip Erdberg, PhD, UC-SF School of Medicine, Corte Madera, CA

Gregory J. Meyer, PhD, University ofToledo, Toledo, OH

Thursday, March 16, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Current research and theory suggests the Rorschach is uniquely suited for assessing personality disorders, avoiding many of the problems that occur with self-report measures. This workshop presents an approach for using the Rorschach to describe personality disorders, using both case vignettes and summaries of the current Rorschach and personality disorder literature, drawing upon both the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Participants should have a basic level of training and clinical experience with the Rorschach. Workshop topics include the following: 1) the importance of the categorical versus dimensional distinction for personality assessment; 2) the alternative DSM-5 Section III model of personality disorder; 3) research on the applicability of the Rorschach with various personality disorder syndromes, with an emphasis on new scales for assessing the grandiosity associated with narcissism; 4) a review of functions related to other specific disorders (schizoid, schizotypal, paranoid, borderline, antisocial, avoidant, and dependent); and 5) variables that address the two fundamental dimensions of the DSM-5 Section III personality disorders – Self (identity and self-direction) and Interpersonal (empathy and intimacy).

Goals and Objectives:

  • Understand the implications of the categorical-dimensional distinction for doing personality assessment
  • Learn about current Rorschach research for personality disorders
  • Understand how Rorschach variables can help describe the principal dimensions of personality disorders
  • Learn how Rorschach data about personality disorder can contribute to intervention planning
  • Apply learning to the interpretation of a case

Skill Level:

Participants should have a basic level of training and clinical experience with the Rorschach.

#18 - Deep Cuts: Employing the Lesser-Known Theoretical/Empirical Features of the MCMI-IV and other Millon Inventories

Seth Grossman, PsyD, FIU College of Medicine, Private Practice, Cooper City, FL

Thursday, March 16, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This workshop directly focuses on the blend of Millon Evolutionary Theory with contemporary empirical methodology, and demonstrates enhanced interpretation and intervention strategies through didactics and case examples. Using insights generated by the theory, participants will learn how to build therapeutic alliance through personalized feedback and therapeutic dialogue. Additionally, the workshop will review the enhanced empirical methodology of the MCMI-IV, and explore empirical progression from earlier methodologies. The workshop will also discuss specific application areas in which further research is desirable. While the MCMI-IV will be emphasized, case examples will also include adult counseling, child, college, and medical psych populations via other Millon inventories.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Operationalize Millon's evolutionary theory for clinical interpretation.
  • Discuss empirical methodology and issues relevant to the Millon Inventories.
  • Utilize a blended theoretical/empirical approach to deepen interpretation and intervention strategies for the MCMI-IV and other Millon Inventories.
  • Interpret MCMI-IV, MACI/M-PACI, MIPS-2, MCCI, and MBMD profiles using this enhanced strategy.

Skill Level:

Intermediate: The workshop assumes working familiarity with at least one of the Millon Inventories.

#19 - CHESSSS, a Free Software for the Rorschach CS: Basic and Advanced Features

Patrick Fontan, PhD, Laboratoire Ipse, Paris West University

Thursday, March 16, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

CHESSSS is a free software solution to score and compute the Rorschach Comprehensive System and Supplementary Scales (Fontan et al, 2013). This application is focused on the needs of clinicians and researchers using the CS: scoring reliability, assistance in protocol interpretation, scoring of Form Qualities, scoring of Supplementary Scales, interrater reliability and management of databases. Basic features of CHESSSS will be presented in the morning. Advanced features and data management will be presented in the afternoon. Participants should come with their computers as practical exercise will be proposed.

Goals and Objectives:

  • What are the two important points concerning CHESSSS installation?
  • Does one need to indicate the value of Z score or to score Poor/Good Human Representation?
  • Why is it important to indicate the age of the examinee in the identification form?
  • How does one compute Inter-rater reliability coefficients in CHESSSS?
  • How does one compute reference values for a sample with CHESSSS?

Skill Level:

This workshop is designed for beginners.

#20 - Adult Attachment and the Therapeutic Agenda: The Place of the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System in a Multidimensional Approach to Treatment and the Reduction of Shame

Carol George, PhD, Mills College

Melissa Lehmann, PhD, Private Practice, Austin, TX

Thursday, March 16, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This workshop will demonstrate how to integrate the assessment of adult attachment into a multidimensional approach to treatment. The workshop begins with a discussion of the basic attachment theory constructs, highlighted by assessment using the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP, George & West, 2012). The workshop then moves to provide an overview of the AAP coding system (this is not an AAP training, but sufficient detail will be provided to serve as the framework for case presentation). This will be followed by a discussion of the different attachment patterns and the ways in which these patterns can help direct the therapeutic agenda, including a discussion of attachment patterns associated with pathological mourning for trauma. Lastly, a case example will be used to demonstrate the AAP in action by discussing how the patterns and coding elements together can be used in psychotherapists to help decrease shame in the context of treatment.

Goals and Objectives:

  • To provide an understanding of key concepts in attachment theory that are central to Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) and that will be central to use in treatment: the attachment relationship, internal working models of attachment, defensive processes
  • To introduce the coding and processing dimensions used in the AAP.
  • To provide an understanding of the contributions of dimensional and organization elements of attachment differing attachment patterns to personality and psychopathology risk.
  • To provide a clear understanding of the meaning of attachment patterns and how they are useful in the context of treatment.
  • To discuss a specific case that addresses reducing shame by utilizing an attachment theory approach to understanding clients’ relational difficulties.

Skill Level:

This workshop is oriented to individuals beginning to use attachment in their practice, and those who wish to integrate assessment with clients who have lingering effects of attachment trauma.



Sunday, March 19, 2017


#21 - R-PAS Coding Solutions

Donald J. Viglione, PhD, Alliant International University, San Diego, CA

Sunday, March 19, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This intermediate/advanced workshop is designed to help R-PAS users develop coding proficiency. Beginning with key principles for R-PAS coding, those attending this workshop will learn to identify and address the major sources of coding errors and inconsistencies. They will apply these principles and specific guidelines in sorting out this-or-that and run-on responses, recognizing distinctions between important and unimportant objects for purposes of Location and Form Quality coding, deciding between borderline cases of Space Reversal, Vague, and Synthesis responses, conducting reliable Form Quality extrapolations, discriminating among determinants close to the coding threshold, weighing the evidence in assigning cognitive codes at varying levels, and honing their skills in coding ODL, MAP, ABS and other thematic elements. The workshop will offer the attendees the opportunity to practice what they've learned on challenging coding dilemmas and to bring their own coding questions.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Begin to develop proficient R-PAS coding skills.
  • Apply the general principles of R-PAS coding to a wide range of coding situations.
  • Use helpful terminology, distinctions, and routines to assist in identifying, describing, and resolving coding challenges.
  • Conduct reliable Form Quality extrapolations.
  • Identify several key issues associated with common coding dilemmas for most categories.

Skill Level:

Intermediate to Advanced: Should already have some experience with R-PAS coding.

#22 - Using Clinical Judgment in Therapeutic Assessment of Adults Who May Or May Not Have An Autism Spectrum Disorder

Dale Rudin, PhD, Center for Therapeutic Assessment, Austin, TX

Sunday, March 19, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Dr. Rudin will discuss a Therapeutic Assessment approach to the assessment of adults with problems in living that are suspected to be part of an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). She will discuss differential diagnoses, useful assessment tools, and how to involve clients as collaborators in the assessment. A key message will be that clinical judgment is essential in making a diagnosis of an ASD and that many variables, including the ramifications of the diagnosis, need to be considered. Points will be illustrated with videos of actual clients, and participants will be actively involved in the workshop.

Goals and Objectives:

After the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • List differential diagnoses to be considered when assessing for ASD
  • Describe at least 3 assessment tools that can be useful in making a diagnosis of ASD
  • Utilize a process that formalizes the use of clinical judgment
  • Discuss ways to involve clients collaboratively in the assessment process

Skill Level:

This is an introductory workshop open to participants at all levels

#23 - The Role of the MMPI-2 RF in Assessment of Trauma Related Conditions

Paul A. Arbisi, PhD, ABAP, ABPP, University of Minnesota

Sunday, March 19, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

The proposed day long workshop will focus on the role of the MMPI-2 RF in a multi-method evaluation of trauma related psychological conditions. During the first half of the workshop, historical background in the use of the MMPI instruments in the evaluation of trauma related psychiatric conditions will be presented followed by an overview and brief review of the MMPI-2 RF including the hierarchical interpretation strategy for the MMPI-2 RF specifically related to scales most associated with sustained emotional disturbance following exposure to traumatic life events. A review and evaluation of accumulating literature demonstrating the utility of MMPI-2 RF in the assessment of trauma related conditions including PTSD will be integrated during the review of the MMPI-2 RF interpretive strategy. The afternoon will focus on the practical implications of the use of the MMPI-2 RF in diagnosis and assessment of trauma related conditions. Cases from a variety of settings will be presented to illustrate the ability of the MMPI-2 RF to assist in diagnostic formulation and treatment planning for trauma related conditions. Emphasis will be placed on identification of frequently co-morbid conditions such as depression, anxiety disorders, and substance misuse disorders and implications of those conditions for treatment. Setting specific considerations will be addressed including issues associated with protocol validity in Veterans Affairs and civil disability evaluations as well as criminal forensic evaluations. Beyond diagnostic considerations, the use of the MMPI-2 RF facilitate treatment matching for empirically supported interventions for PTSD will be discussed. Data will be presented supporting the use of the MMPI-2 RF in selecting individuals who are likely to respond best to exposure based interventions. Finally, participants will be encouraged to share de-identified case examples.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Participants will list MMPI-2 RF scales that, when elevated, are consistent with a trauma related condition.
  • Participants will be able to describe the subtypes of PTSD as reflected on the MMPI-2 RF
  • Participants will be able to discuss setting and trauma specific effects in the assessment of trauma related conditions with the MMPI-2 RF.
  • Participants will be able to use the MMPI-2 RF to evaluate treatment readiness in individuals considering exposure based treatments for PTSD. 5.
  • Participants will be able to discuss the relative utility of a broadband assessment instrument over narrow band diagnostic specific instruments in the assessment of trauma related conditions

Skill Level:

The workshop requires an intermediate level of skill in interpreting the MMPI-2 RF and experience with assessment of trauma related conditions

#24 - Forensic Applications of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI)

Mark A. Ruiz, PhD, ABPP, James A. Haley Veterans Hospital and Clinics, Tampa, FL

Sunday, March 19, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This day-long training course will focus on the forensic applications of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). The training will initially make a case for the importance of self-report assessment in forensic evaluation, with particular attention being paid to the drawbacks of other assessment methods (e.g., projective testing, structured interview). The relevance of various ethical and practice guidelines will be reviewed. The training will then review interpretive procedures and empirical results pertaining to the PAI in various roles including risk assessment, diagnosis for sentencing mitigation, mental state at the time of offense, and child custody evaluation. Issues and empirical findings related to the PAI in its assessment of response styles will be reviewed. The training will then move on to the use of the PAI in evaluating issues related to Andrews and Bonta’s (2010) conceptual domains of risk, needs, and responsiveness. Each component of the training will include detailed reviews of relevant empirical research as well as case study results based on actual clinical scenarios. Each component will address the use of the PAI with racial and ethnic minorities.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe the general overview of the PAI and the information it provides within a theoretical framework relevant to forensic evaluation.
  • Be prepared to defend the use of the PAI in any challenge to admissibility.
  • Identify the primary ethical guidelines that support the use of self-report assessments and the limitations of other assessment formats.
  • Describe the primary PAI scales and indices used to evaluate response style, risk of harm to self and others, mental illness, and treatment responsiveness.
  • Understand the limitations of the PAI with respect to evaluating racial and ethnic minorities.
  • Synthesize testing and historical case information and apply PAI interpretive techniques to case examples from clinical and forensic evaluations.

Skill Level:

Advanced graduate students, researchers, and practicing clinicians.

#25 - Building Empathy Through Assessment: A Model for Integrating Therapeutic Assessment into Forensic Practice

F. Barton Evans, PhD, ETSU College of Medicine, Johnson City, TN

Bruce L. Smith, PhD, ABAP, UC-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Sunday, March 19, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (7 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Forensic assessment and clinical assessment have traditionally been seen as incompatible enterprises. In the former, information gathering and skeptical neutrality are the norm, whereas empathy and collaboration are hallmarks of the latter. In this workshop we will present a hybrid forensic assessment model, Building Empathy through Assessment (BETAssessment) that integrates core principles from Collaborative / Therapeutic Assessment (CTA) into forensic assessment. This model of assessment maintains the requirements for both skepticism and neutrality necessary for a competent evaluation in legal contexts, while offering “experience near” CTA methods to enhance accuracy and humanity within forensic assessment. In- depth case analyses from family law, civil litigation, and immigration court will be presented and discussed.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Participants will elaborate core requirements of neutrality and objectivity in forensic psychological assessment.
  • Participants will distinguish the four collaborative assessment models and demonstrate differences in approach to assessment from traditional forensic assessment.
  • Participants will learn the BETA method of assessment, including the three core BETAssessmentTM principles applicable across nearly all personality assessment contexts.
  • Participants will learn how to apply C/TA principles to forensic assessments in diverse settings and to demonstrate ways that assessment psychologists can modify forensic assessment practices in certain psycholegal areas to increase collaborative outcomes.
  • Participants will learn about the potential pitfalls in using BETA in forensic applications.
  • Demonstrate the application of BETAssessment in forensic settings such as through case examples.

Skill Level:

All levels. Some knowledge of forensic assessment and/or CTA would be helpful, but not necessary.

#26 - A Practical Overview of the Wartegg Drawing Completion Test According to the Crisi Wartegg System (CWS)

Alessandro Crisi, PsyD, Istituto Italiano Wartegg, Rome, Italy

Jacob A. Palm, PhD, Southern California Center for Collaborative Assessment, Long Beach, CA

Sunday, March 19, 8:00 am – 11:45 am (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

This workshop presents a practical introduction to Crisi Wartegg System (CWS), a methodology for the clinical use of the Wartegg Drawing Completion Test (WDCT). The WDCT is a performance-based drawing technique that can be completed in 5-10 minutes by the client and is appropriate for children, adolescents, and adults including individuals with mental disabilities. Once one becomes competent in its use, the test takes 40-45 minutes to administer, score and interpret. The WDCT is becoming better known in the United States, with several sequences of training completed with US-based clinicians. A recent meta-analysis attests to its validity in assessing personality and psychopathology, and reliability and validity data of the CWS is commensurate with both self-report (MMPI-2) and performance-based (Rorschach) personality measures. The CWS was also recently recognized as a valid performance-based personality method that can be used for certification in Therapeutic Assessment, given the measure’s ease of use, resonance with clients, and non-threatening nature. Topics covered in this workshop include introduction to the history of the WDCT, as well as the development of the CWS. Reliability and validity data will be reviewed, as well as recommended clinical use and incremental validity of this measure. Participants will learn proper administration procedures and be provided with introduction to major scoring categories of the CWS. Applied case examples and practice scoring exercises will be collaborative reviewed. Lastly, a variety of clinical cases examples and protocols will be provided to demonstrate both the utility of the measure and its discriminative power between clients with various presenting symptoms or challenges. Prior to exposure to the CWS, participants will have the opportunity to complete the test independently, with time provided for reflection on their experience and initial reactions.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Describe clinical use of the CWS, including the clinical populations the measure is appropriate for, as well as the incremental validity/benefits of use in clinical practice;
  • List the steps required for proper administration of the WDCT according to the CWS;
  • List and describe the major scoring categories of the CWS;
  • Correctly score CWS-specific scoring domains of Evocative Character (EC) and Affective Quality (AQ);
  • Utilize CWS scoring and analysis to differentiate between various clinical symptoms and presentations through review and discussion of case examples

Skill Level:

This is an introductory training on the CWS; no previous use of the test is required although thorough grounding in psychological assessment and theory is recommended. It is further useful if attendees have previous knowledge of the Rorschach and other performance-based personality tests. This workshop is open to mental health professionals and graduate students training to be mental health professionals.

#27 - Assessing Autobiographical Memory in a Personality Assessment: Why?

Arnold R. Bruhn, PhD, Private Practice, Chevy Chase, MD

Sunday, March 19, 1:15 pm – 5:00 pm (3.5 CE)

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Workshop Information:

Do you know that approximately 30% of clients in long term insight oriented therapy have serious traumas, molestations and abuse they have never discussed with their therapists? Assessing a man who had been sexually abused by a scoutmaster years before (Bruhn 1995, Oxford U Press) opened my eyes to this infrequently reported problem. We want to help as professionals. But how can we heal what has never been revealed? Do you know that you can find out what is really brings a client in for therapy in roughly a minute even if your client cannot tell you directly? An Early Memories Procedure (Bruhn 1989) is ordinarily completed by new clients outside the office, but two pieces of data on pages 9 to 11 can commonly tell you exactly what you need to know about why they are coming to you for help now. This workshop will present what you need to know to ground you in memories assessment. Which memory is key for your client? What memories tell you what is missing in their lives? How well can a client bond and trust? Is PTSD an issue? Are you treating a psychopath? Dr Bruhn has developed the field of memories work over the past 44 years. He broke the code for internal and external locus of control beliefs as a graduate student at Duke University and through the use of the précis has shown that negative affect memories reveal the contexts in our lives which we are struggling to master today. He views memories as perceptographs that reflect the operation of the mind. Arnold R Bruhn is the author of Earliest Childhood Memories: Theory and Application to Clinical Practice (Bruhn 1990) which is being updated and reissued this year on its 25th anniversary.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Learn to interpret positive and negative affect memories and understand the unique role of each.
  • Know the standard memory assessment procedures and when to use each.
  • Be able to administer and interpret an Early Memories Procedure (Bruhn 1989) at a beginning level. Which memory tells us what brings the client in for help? What is the client’s major unresolved issue? [take Part 1 of the EMP in the workshop...identify your own key memory and related task which you are working on now]
  • Be able to look at a set of memories and identify the following: Spontaneous vs Directed memories; Positive affect vs negative affect memories.
  • Be familiar with the Comprehensive Early Memories Scoring System—Revised (Last & Bruhn 1991), Part VII, Content and Process themes, which distinguish various kinds of memories.

Skill Level:

Grad students in a mental health related field or advanced.

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Ask your favorite personality assessor what the biggest personality assessment convention is, and he/she will tell you it's the Annual Convention of the Society for Personality Assessment. Ask him/her what the best personality assessment convention is, and he/she will tell you it's the Annual Convention of the Society for Personality Assessment, held every March in a different city.

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How Therapeutic Assessment Works: Theory and Techniques - Presented by Stephen E. Finn, PhD. In this webinar, Dr. Stephen Finn, the main developer of Therapeutic Assessment, will explain the techniques of TA and how they relate to TA’s underlying theory of client change. This session is particularly suited to those who are new to TA, including graduate students, or who wish to deepen their understanding of its therapeutic mechanisms.

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